A Quilter's Alphabet, Blog

A Quilter’s Alphabet: G for Grain

Hi friends!

Today in the Quilter’s Alphabet series, Tammy and I are exploring the letter G!  I will be talking about fabric grain!

A Quilter's Alphabet, featured by top US quilting blog and shop Seams Like a Dream Quilt Designs explains G for grain. Click to read more!

A Quilter’s Alphabet: Grain

When we talk about fabric grain we are referring to the threads in a fabric- fabric is made from crosswise threads and lengthwise threads. Whenever someone mentions straight of grain, they could be referring to a cut along the lengthwise threads or the crosswise threads. Just not along the diagonal!

Let’s explore more!

Lengthwise Threads

Lengthwise threads run parallel to the selvedge edge or along the length of the fabric. They are also called warp threads. The fabric will have the least amount of stretch along this threads as these threads are held tightly to the loom when weaving the fabric.

A Quilter's Alphabet, featured by top US quilting blog and shop Seams Like a Dream Quilt Designs explains G for grain. Click to read more!

Crosswise Threads

The crosswise threads in a fabric run from selvedge edge to selvedge edge. Also referred to as cross grain or the weft threads. They are woven into the lengthwise threads and the fabric will have little more stretch along these threads.

A Quilter's Alphabet, featured by top US quilting blog and shop Seams Like a Dream Quilt Designs explains G for grain. Click to read more!

Note: that is why some quilters feel borders should always be cut from lengthwise strips of fabric- they will stretch less.

Bias

True bias refers to a cut at a 45 degree angle from any crosswise or lengthwise thread. But really, any cut on an angle is along a bias. Bias cuts are the most stretchy cuts you can make.

A Quilter's Alphabet, featured by top US quilting blog and shop Seams Like a Dream Quilt Designs explains G for grain. Click to read more!

Which is why, when you make cuts for a half square triangle, you start by cutting a square in half along the diagonal.

A Quilter's Alphabet, featured by top US quilting blog and shop Seams Like a Dream Quilt Designs explains G for grain. Click to read more!

Then when you sew the triangles together, the bias is inside the block, not along the outer edges.

Bias cuts are good when you need to work around an angle, such as binding a scalloped edge quilt.

A Quilter's Alphabet, featured by top US quilting blog and shop Seams Like a Dream Quilt Designs explains G for grain. Click to read more!
Bunny Side Up!

Now that we know a little more about grain, let’s head on over to Tammy’s Quilter’s Alphabet post to see what information she has for us on grids in quilting!

A Quilter's Alphabet, featured by top US quilting blog and shop Seams Like a Dream Quilt Designs explains G for grain. Click to read more!

Next week in the Exploring the Basics series, we will chat about the Peaky and Spike unit!

happy quilting!

Kate

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